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Shocking! Former Soviet Union's Military Plan to Sweep China Exposed

News Report      03-26-2009                    

According to military documents being leaked out in China, the Former Soviet Union's Military Plan to Sweep China ExposedFormer Soviet Union had planned to take massive military actions in an attempt to wipe out China.

At that time, the USSR army had the following deployments in Asia. Along the east then USSR-China border: three army groups and one army infantry group under the Far East Military Command, totaled 18 infantry divisions, one tank division and two airborne assault brigades; three army groups under the Back Baikal Military Command, totaled ten infantry divisions, three tank divisions; five infantry divisions under the Siberia Military Command; three infantry divisions and two tank divisions stationed in Mongolia. Along the west then USSR-China border: eight infantry divisions, one tank divisions under the Central-Asia Military Command; five infantry divisions, one tank division and one airborne division under the Turkistan Military Command.

Soviet Union's then total armed forces stationed in Asia included 1.27 million troops, 14,300 tanks and 4,200 airplanes. Among 59 army divisions in total, 45 divisions, or 675,000 troops were stationed along the USSR-China border.

On China's side, there were over 2 million troops regularly stationed near the northern borders, among which the Shenyang Army Region alone had 830 thousands.

In the Far East where transportations were long and difficult, the best strategy for the Soviet Union to win a war against China at that time was to plan a quick decisive attack, considering as what they faced was a large country that had great long term defense abilities, huge active armed forces and sufficient military reserves. In such a strategy, they would first make full use of firepower to destroy China's strongest military corps, i.e., the Shenyang Army Region, then seize rich farm lands and oil fields in the northeast of China, and ultimately force China's summation. But if they were to launch attacks along  the east border, they would need at least 1.2 to 1.5 million troops, with three front armies surrounding the Shenyang Military Region, and one front army containing the Beijing Military Region. For doing so, they would have to dispatch 2 front armies, 67 army divisions, and the entire command systems as well as forces of 14 army groups from the Back Baikal and the Far East Regions so to reach a total scale of 4 front armies, 20 army groups and 100 army divisions. Based on their transportation abilities at that time, it would take to them at least 80 days to have all troops in place. That would be too slow; China could easily figure it out and take pre-emptive attacks. On the other hand, the inventories and transportation capacities USSR had in the Far East wouldn't be able to support a protracted war. Therefore, the real intention that the USSR had when they stationed massive military forces along the USSR-China borders was to force China to come back to the negotiating table. Their focus at that time was still on Europe.

On the other hand, China was prepared to defend possible USSR invasion in all front lines with much bigger number of troops and military equipments stationed in entire northern China. China realized that if the Soviet Union was to launch attacks, they would come from three directions, north, northeast and northwest. From north, the well-equipped USSR Number 39 Mechanized Army Group stationed in Mongolia could suddenly attack Beijing. Considering the Soviet military possessed quick offensive tactics and advanced weapons and other equipments, it was not impossible for them to reach Beijing city within 3 to 4 days.

China was aware of the extreme difficulties of holding onto Beijing merely with the military forces in the region if the Soviet's invasion was to happen. So they planed to move all people and government offices out of Beijing as soon as the military actions took place. Yanshan mountains is to the west of the city. Large mountains would effectively reduce enemy's offensive momentum. The purposes of such a move were to gain time so to position the country into a war time system and to wait for new reinforcing troops dispatched from the southern military regions. 

In the 1970's, the Chinese troops were in general lack of training due to a series of political events that lasted for long time. The average education level of soldiers and officers was also low. These factors caused military's comparably weak combat capabilities. The army infantries might have better qualities, but other military divisions all had problems. During the war of defending Zhenbao Island, for example, the Chinese artillery had shown great weaknesses comparing the artillery from the Soviet Union. The USSR military system had been in general quarters constantly, their troops were highly capable and effective.

At that time, China's defense strategies in the west included "lure the enemy in deep", pocket ambush,  border gorillas and setting Lanzhou as the final defense. In the east, China had planed to unitize the deep mountain forests to form resistances, and to conduct "positional warfare", "mobile warfare" and "guerrilla warfare" when possible. A final line of defense in the east was set in Shanhaiguan. The most problematic front for China to plan the defense against potential invasion of the Soviet Union was still in the north, between Mongolia and Beijing. The distance was too short. If a war were to begin, the Soviet's Tank Army Group stationed in Mongolia would have headed directly to Beijing. Therefore, Soviet's massive military deployments along the borders had constituted great threats to China's safety and security in the 60's to 70's.     

 

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